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Psion integrated Global Navigation handheld devices

PsionWorkabout3

Blackroc Procyon range of GNSS receivers based on Psion Workabout Pro 3 provides professional grade GNSS capability fully integrated within a handheld unit.

Psion and Blackroc Technology announce new range of integrated Global Navigation Satellite System handheld devices

First mass availability commercial product built on the principles of Psion’s unique Open Source Mobility philosophy – Psion PLC (LSE: PON.L), a global provider of mobile computing solutions, and Blackroc Technology Ltd, a mobile computing and data capture specialist, announce the first mainstream global positioning handheld units that offer pinpoint location accuracy. By integrating a high specification Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver into the Psion Workabout Pro 3 handheld computer, the Blackroc Technology Procyon™ unit can achieve ‘fix accuracy’ up to 1 to 2 centimetres.

The Procyon solution was made possible by Psion’s Open Source Mobility (OSM) strategy.

Psion’s OSM strategy, which consists of three elements: modularity, customisation and open innovation, enabled the development of Blackroc’s Procyon solution. By using OSM, Blackroc can build customised devices that offer a gamut of different GNSS products - from low-cost commercial grade solutions up to high-end professional global positioning solutions.

“Psion’s modular platform is coupled with advanced development tools and support to provide the highest levels of mobile hardware customization in the market.  We work directly with our customers and partners to facilitate new products that meet the specific needs of the niche marketplaces,” said John Conoley, CEO of Psion. “The result of our relationship with Blackroc Technology, which is creating a range of highly sophisticated GNSS devices, is a strong example of how our OSM business strategy is working and creating value that extends beyond Psion.”

GNSS is the umbrella term for satellite systems that encompass all global technologies, including the US satellite system, GPS. It is used in a very wide range of applications and is a rapidly growing market, covering applications from vehicle navigation, aircraft navigation and marine navigation to precision machine guidance, construction control, and surveying and mapping. According to market research[1], the overall GNSS market is forecast to be over 3.0 billion receivers in 2025, with around 1.9 billion and 1.1 billion from mobile phones and road transport markets respectively.

“By working with Psion, we can cover the whole market requirement for GNSS handhelds from entry level 15 metre accuracy products right up to fully integrated dual constellation network enabled real time kinematic (RTK) rover systems with 1 to 2cm accuracy,” said Tony Jephcott, CEO of Blackroc Technology.

“The Procyon range is our answer to customers in the global construction companies and survey industries that are looking for scalable devices where positional accuracies of 1cm are often required.”

[1] * ProDDAGE Market Research (Programme for the Development and Demonstration of Applications of Galileo and EGNOS) and Market Analysis (Arthur and Jenkins, ESYS plc, November 2005).

Procyon uncovered

All devices in the Procyon range come with a colour camera for taking geo referenced pictures.  Photos can be stored on-board with the 1GB of flash memory or using the external SD card slot for additional memory. There is also an internal GSM modem that allows connection to network correction services, file data transfer, Internet or even e-mail. Unlike other devices which feature soft keypads, the Procyon also comes with a real, tactile keypad to facilitate data entry.

For more information or to see the products in action, visit us at the INTERGEO trade show from 27 to 29 September 2011 in Nuremberg, Germany at stand 7.F7.

INTERGEO, Nuremberg, Germany. Tuesday 27 September 2011