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You are here: Home Biometrics Software The healthcare sector will spend approximately $88.9 billion worldwide on information technology and communications products in 2010
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The healthcare sector will spend approximately $88.9 billion worldwide on information technology and communications products in 2010

An increase of 3.2 percent compared to 2011. While IT spending is on the rise, upfront and operational costs are keeping healthcare providersfrom implementing electronic medical records (EMR). These findings come from the 2nd Annual Healthcare IT Insights and Opportunities survey released by the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA).

Three-quarters of respondents to the survey said that upfront costs discouraged them from investing in EMR, while 64 percent indicated that operational costs were a factor. Data security and privacy was also a concern among 39 percent of respondents, and focus groups found that doctors felt EMRs took away from the personal relationship between doctors and patients.

Doctors who have adopted EMR rank better patient care as the number one reason (70 percent) why they made the investment. Improved efficiency (68 percent) and reduced risk of error were also ranked high (58 percent). Cost savings ranked last (30 percent) among doctors, but 52 percent of healthcare IT (HIT) providers believe cost savings is a major factor influencing adoption of EMR.

Half of healthcare providers are using some form of EMR - 34 percent comprehensive EMR, 16 percent partial system.
. Hospitals and health clinics were the highest users of EMR, with 53 percent reporting they had a comprehensive EMR system in place. Solo practitioners were least likely to use EMR with 41 percent responding that they have taken no action to implement EMR in their practice.


The most commonly used features of EMR are charting (92 percent), scheduling (89 percent) and document storage and management (85 percent).
Among healthcare practitioners who have not adopted EMR, the features they are most interested in are charting (76 percent), document storage and management (69 percent) and e-prescriptions (65 percent). These figures indicate that the features are already available for those that have yet to adopt EMR practices.
Doctors would be more likely to adopt EMR if they were faster (57 percent), less complex (51 percent) and were lower in cost (47 percent).